Happy 10th birthday, T&G

I have been blogging for 10 years this month. I can’t figure out the exact day I really started because I began “blogging” using Geocities-hosted web pages that I slapped up on my old (dead) domain, theology-and-geometry.com. The Wayback Machine used to keep a bunch of my content from that site archived, but I’ve noticed over the years the amount that it indexes continues to dwindle, and now you can’t even really get past the splash page for any of the dates.

I would write a post — with hand-coded html formatting — on a basic page, and then for the next entry, create a new page for the previous post so it would link behind the first page, cut and paste the previous entry and put it on the new page and then put my new entry on the splash page. And so on. God, it was tedious. And then that November, Blogger happened. And that, friends, sealed the deal. Blogger made it so incredibly easy. And I could dink with how the whole thing looked a lot more easily than in Geocities. Also, Blogger would work on a Mac. Geocities’ PageBuilder thingy wouldn’t. Can you imagine?

So that is why my archives here only go back to November 2003.

I was a student then, a year away from wrapping up my college experience and thrusting myself into the workplace. Ugh. “Thrusting.” I lived with my boyfriend in a small one-bedroom apartment — with a laundry room! — that we paid $425 a month for. We had two ferrets. We had a rule that at night we would only watch things on TV that were nonviolent, nonthreatening and nonaggressive. I played video games. I wasn’t speaking to my sister and I don’t remember why. My family’s political incorrectness was really novel and annoying to me then, and made me question my DNA origins.

I worried constantly about grades and assignments and all three of my jobs. “I am tired of working 51 hours a week” is a thing I wrote, and EL OH EL because if I could drop into my 2003 self’s dreams I would laugh in her face about thinking that working 51 hours a week in college was going to be the last time I would work so hard.

It was a sweet little life. Not without its trials, of course. I sort of wish I had used my time in college to break out of my comfort zone a little more. Travel more. Sleep around, maybe? Do a lot of mind-expanding drugs? I don’t know. I say I should have done those things but I am pretty sure I would have felt completely ridiculous even trying to have some kind of typical wild college experience. I’ve been middle-aged my whole life.

So here’s to 10 years of writing it down. Gonna aim for 10 more.

31 years and 30 days

The other day I learned that a childhood friend shot and killed himself. I had lost touch with him since graduating and leaving Hardin County. Honestly, I probably didn’t have a whole lot to do with him during high school either. We ran in different circles and I had my head up my boyfriend’s ass all through high school. I always thought he was so cute, though. I remember him being so silly, too. In middle school, group of us would spend lunch in our English teacher’s classroom, playing cards and being silly.

I learned about it through Facebook. Some cryptic comments here and there got me suspicious and I kept checking Topix until someone asked and confirmed that he had shot himself. His obit says he was an NRA member.

I don’t know. The whole thing just makes me really fucking sad.

Spinning

Motivational poster

It’s 10 p.m. and I’m sitting at a blue plastic table, sipping a canned Coke. I’m surrounded by banks of whirring silver washing machines, and I’ve figured out that by sitting at this table, I can feel the blasts of cold air from the AC. It’s a nice counter to the heat radiating off all these dryers. This is the Wash Tub Coin Laundry, open 25 hours, according to a sign on the side of the building. I am not entirely sure that’s meant to be funny.

Visiting Laundromats every other week or so is something I’ve been doing since we moved. Of course, I should be doing it much more often than that but we literally use every piece of clean fabric in the house before I get weird about not having anything to dry off with after a shower, and surrender and load my car up with every rag we own.

Our landlords were kind enough to leave their washer and dryer in the house for us in case we wanted to adopt them, but they warned us that there was an issue with the washer that would need to be repaired. I tried to get a repair company to come out and look at it but they refused to do so since the house is rented. Besides, I think having the thing repaired to the degree it is probably going to need might cost more than I am willing to spend on a repair job. Just a hunch. I finally decided the other day to throw in the towel and just buy a new washing machine because going to the Laundromat is a pain in the ass when you’re single and you just have a trash bag full of your own clothes. It’s practically torture when you’ve got three towering baskets full of three people’s clothes — some of them sporting more than a little poop (I won’t tell you whose) — to wash and dry using every quarter you can possibly get your hands on.

The Wash Tub has an interesting ethos. There are three things on the wall that are not washing related:

• A poster featuring the characters of the Marvel Universe
• A poster featuring a blonde beach babe busting out of her bikini while reclining in water
• A calendar featuring pictures of churches

There’s also a pool table. When I first got here, there were a couple of guys playing a game. Now the guy who helped me get my clothes inside (such service!) is lying down on it, watching TV. There is a group of three teenagers who came in with no laundry; they just wanted to play the shitty arcade games, I guess. I feel like someone should tell them they’d get a better value for their money if they gave me their quarters to finish drying my jeans. It’s an investment.

I remember doing my laundry in college sometimes at that Laundromat next to La Siesta, near Murphy Center. (I seriously just had to sit here and think for a few minutes about what Murphy Center is called. Shameful.) I didn’t have any concept then of the sheer volume of laundry that was to come in my life. Just like I have no concept now of how much laundry is going to be involved as my child gets older and we stop being lazy and put him in two-piece outfits more often.

Life in Murfreesboro was ages ago. I think if I went back to my old haunts, I’d be really pissed that I let my youth slip away so quickly. But what can you do. I purposefully did not put a question mark on that last sentence. Because I am not asking.

My sister found some old cassettes in my parents’ attic

They’re from the late ’80s, when my brother and sister and I would leave our boombox on record for hours on end, until the tapes would run out. They are packed with preciousness and hilarity. I have fuzzy memories of making some of these recordings in our old house, perched on a bunk bed with the bedside lamp on, a blanket hanging from the top for some privacy.

My mom let me hear some snippets when she was in town this weekend because she has a tape player in her Explorer. I have got to find a tape player so I can get them all recorded digitally before the tapes themselves melt or worse.

Here’s a bit I caught on my phone of my mom and me listening to a tape (meta!) where I am singing a Bon Jovi song and then, later, trying to get my 2-year-old brother to talk.

Evan and Lindsey on tape in the late ’80s

Hope you enjoy my drawl, y’all.

ETA: ARGH WHY WON’T THIS PLAYYYYYYYY

How many Chipper puns should I try to make for this title?

I caught wind on Twitter that Chipper Jones is retiring. I haven’t kept up very much with Chipper or baseball in general for many years, but back in seventh or eighth grade, I fell hard for Chipper. I just happened to see his face flit across the TV during the game and I was instantly in love. He had that easy boyish grin that always hooks me. I watched the game to find out his name and from then on did everything I could to find out every morsel about his life. This was pre-internet so it wasn’t easy, but I was very devoted. I watched every game that I could catch on television and recorded them, even if I had watched them live. I clipped stories from the newspaper that mentioned him, and clipped his box score if he’d had a good game. I watched SportsCenter for highlights of the games to catch a glimpse of him. I amassed lots of Chipper and Braves memorabilia — glossy photos, pennants, keychains, hats, shirts, magazines. I drew rudimentary portraits of Chipper and hung them on my wall. I was his biggest fan.

Our eighth grade class took a trip to Atlanta to a Braves game (I don’t remember why now; I will have to consult my diary) and I was sort of convinced in that eighth-grade way of thinking that I was going to be able to meet Chipper Jones and he was going to fall for me despite my braces and my being 14 freaking years old. Turns out our seats were on the third-base line (yay!) but we were way out in the outfield. Not even within yelling distance of Chipper. (Now I don’t remember anything about the game except the extremely drunk GROWN-ASS dude who put his arm around me and had people take our picture. My teacher, Mrs. Yeiser, tried to confiscate the roll of film, heh. She did not get it. Now where is that dang picture?!)

So, I didn’t meet and snag Chipper. But I kept hope alive.

I remember being so upset that Hideo Nomo won rookie of the year that year instead of Chipper. And now where is Hideo Nomo? HE DON’T PLAY BALL NOMO. I’m sorry. But the snub stung and may have fucked up my head a little bit.

I really got a reality smack across the face during a game one day many months into my crush, when the camera panned over some big-haired lady in the audience. She was wearing a cowboy hat and she was very blonde. The announcer mentioned that this was Mrs. Chipper Jones and my heart fell out of my chest with a wet thud. Wait, he was MARRIED?! To a lady wearing a COWBOY HAT?! And so that day I began mopping up my messy affections for the third baseman from Marietta, Ga., realizing they were a pipe dream. Also I probably had some other dude I was crushing on at the time so I had to reserve my energy and pour it directly into that ridiculousness.

So, fare well in your retirement, Chipper. I’ll always have fond memories of your prickly little goatee and your chewing-tobacco habit. You know, I always thought that was super gross but I was going to make an exception just for you.

Shot in the dark

When the Japan quake and tsunami hit, I started thinking about two Japanese girls I used to be pen pals with in grade school. Girls? Yikes. They’d be old ladies like I am now. I couldn’t conjure up the name of one of the girls, but the other’s name has stuck with me my whole life: Hitomi Imanaka. I remember the stationery she’d use when she wrote me: It was etched with one of those quintessentially Japanese androgynous smiling cartoon characters, and shellacked with stickers. Her English was rough (my Japanese was nonexistent) and her handwriting was shaky with large counters and bowls — very deliberate. I don’t remember what we wrote each other about, but if I had to guess: Pets, television, movies, school. I have her letters somewhere. I hope, as I continue my spring cleaning, I’ll run across them.

I searched Facebook and found a Hitomi Imanaka. I sent her a message, asking if she was my pen pal from ages ago. I mostly wanted to ask her where she lived and if she was okay.

It wasn’t the same girl.

So help me, Jesus

I don’t remember how I heard about them but I was in high school, trying to scavenge for what bits of cool I could (I wore Walmart knockoffs of Airwalks until I could weasel my way into a real pair) when I heard about the Toadies. One day I found myself with my grandmother at the Old Hickory Mall in Jackson, in Camelot Music (which is now FYE, I think), with Rubberneck in hand, heading for the checkout counter. My grandmother looked at the album and the song names and asked me what kind of music that was.

I came from a household where Hells Bells was required viewing and Depeche Mode’s Violator had been summarily removed from my sister’s tape deck and destroyed because it contained a song called “Personal Jesus.” And Aerosmith, despite my dad having loooved that band as a teenager/young adult, was frowned upon in all its iterations.

So I told Grandmaw, while skimming the band thank-yous in the liner notes and pointing out that they had given thanks to a pastor, “They’re some kind of Christian band, see?”

 

Here it is, more than 12 years later, and I still love this album like the first day I heard it. I find it impossible to listen to Rubberneck‘s songs without thrashing about a bit. Visual aid:

So help me Jeeeeesus from Lindsey Turner on Vimeo.

Doing stuff

I am having a super productive run lately. Got several commissioned photography projects I’m working on — including my first official Etsy sale! — that are keeping me occupied. I’m putting new and interesting things in the ground thanks to saraclark, and I can’t wait to see them shine next spring and summer. I am seeing more of my friends these past few days than I have in the past half year. I am behind on phone calls and finding the urge to write but not the time. October has almost gotten out from under me and I’ve not yet visited a single haunted place in this city, as was my intention at the end of September. I don’t know when I’d do it, or with whom. Any takers? I need to feel the goosebumps of Halloween every year or else I don’t quite start the steady coast into the festiveness of Thanksgiving and beyond. Superstitious, maybe. I just have high expectations for the last quarter of the year, that’s all, and a spooky October is my lucky gameday sock, so to speak.

This time last year I was waiting to close on my house, and stressing out to high heaven about it. Work was insanely busy (and has been this week, oddly enough) and I was run ragged by last-minute loan finagling and the notion that everything I had been working for could crumble at any second in part because I had lost my wallet and license on a road trip. Dumb. I see that I posted a Promise Ring video this time last year, too. How weird is that? Incredibly weird. Who’s running this show, anyway, and why do I even bother trying to control it?

This October has had its moments of pure humiliating suckitude but so far it’s been markedly better than 2009′s October, which eventually put me in the ER with some crazy allergic reaction that kept me out of work for a week with an ongoing migraine and hive outbreaks. I am lucky that nothing has ever put me down like that before or since, but it still freaks me out to think that my body can break down like that under just the weight of mental pressure. I have to remember that I have limits. And I have to learn how to respect those limits because they will kick my ass if I don’t.

Anyway, back to editing photos. I can’t wait to share some from my photoshoot with Jerm and Krissi and Piper at the Botanic Gardens. It feels nice to feel like I’m learning and growing as a photographer and artist, but it also feels really nice to be able to help people capture moments in their lives that they will cherish forever. I’m pleased with how things are going lately.

Friday night highlights

cadencebw

The oldest nephew is a sophomore in high school (eeeep!) and is a band kid, just like his dear ol’ auntie. He plays the tenors, and gets to do the intro to the cool new cadence. I always wanted to play percussion but I lack the ability to wail on objects with any sense of rhythm. I find it deliciously bitchin’ that both my brother and my nephew have drum-related talent. casey on tenors

Friday night the fella and I hauled ass to Hardin County to catch a home football game so I could see Casey perform in the halftime show. The band’s show this year is Beatles themed, and while I am not the biggest Beatles fan who ever ironically traversed a crosswalk, I thought it was fun. (For the record, I tend to prefer highly funk-based field shows that involve lots of inappropriate dancing and maybe even some shouting.) The kids sounded great. The mellophones wailed like antelopes, just like old times. I wanted more oomph out of my beloved trombone section, naturally. There were at least a dozen of them; they should have melted my earwax with their sound. But then again, my band directors always had a hard time getting a big sound out of little ol’ modest me. Which kind of blows my mind now. If I played an instrument in 2010, you’d be hard pressed to ever get me to drop below forte. Truth.

I’m proud of Casey. My parents give him a hard time for sleeping late and being lazy and sort of flighty and teenagery, but when he’s in his element, he is on point. I hope he keeps it up. Fun sidenote: During the band’s third-quarter rest period, I spied him schmoozing with a cute girl named Paige. They were all laughing and joking and taking cell phone pictures of themselves together, and it was adorable. The youngest nephew made sure to stay around them and bug the everloving shit out of them (is it wrong to use the term “cockblock” when talking about your youngish nephews? yes, yes I think it is), so I got a good kick out of that. They are growing up too damned fast for my taste but it’s fun to watch it happen.